November 18, 2016

Trump’s America, as Seen From Brexitland

 Dear Americans: You have my deepest sympathy. We Remainers are familiar with your plight—the shock, the bewilderment, the vague feeling of dread when you wake each morning. What America is enduring—the triumph of lies and xenophobia over enlightened value—is perhaps even harder to bear than it was in England during Brexit since there is nothing quite as monstrous or false as Donald Trump over here, or anywhere else in Europe. But the Trump victory and Brexit are the result of the same populist insurgency, as many Trump supporters have gleefully pointed out. The Far Right is also on the march in France, Germany, Holland, Austria, and across Eastern Europe, and it has drawn strength from Trump’s victory.

The similarities in the condition of the U.K. and the U.S. are remarkable, particularly the resentment for the political and metropolitan elites felt by insurgents. We have heard much about the inequalities that pushed people to vote against their own economic interests in Britain and some of those arguments have been used to explain the Trump phenomenon. I don’t buy them all, by the way, but it’s clear that neither Trump’s economic plan nor the floundering British government will do anything to alleviate the lot of the people who have voted for the upset. Britain’s withdrawal from its nearest market and America’s proposed isolationism will do more to destroy jobs and prosperity than any policy either country has pursued since the war.

This will be the moment when supporters of a rational and enlightened society will strike to make their most devastating critique of Trump and Brexit. In the meantime, however, the majority of Americans who are suffering the painful sense of loss and confusion have to know that there are millions on the other side of the Atlantic who appreciate what you are going through. We have your back. Good luck.



1 comment:

  1. Anonymous10:24 AM

    The second paragraph above would be the most significant in Henry Porter's essay. It touches on, but does not explain, the discontent felt by those who no longer support the status quo.

    "We have heard much about the inequalities that pushed people to vote against their own economic interests in Britain and some of those arguments have been used to explain the Trump phenomenon."

    Henry Porter chose not to explain by simply declaring: "I don't buy them all".

    I wonder which ones doesn't he buy and which ones does he agrees with?


    The following is a short essay, supported by hard data, which addresses the inequalities that Porter would rather not address, but nevertheless inequalities that have given rise to what we label "populism". Inequalities that if not addressed will see the 95% living in a debt based neo-feudal paradigm without understanding how and why they ended up in the shit.

    The last thing the greedy and powerful financial elite want is for the 99% to abandon the (elite controlled) media's divide and conquer operation, unite and lock them up in prison where they truly belong.

    The Great Con: Political Correctness Has Marginalized the Working Class

    Let's look at political correctness and identity politics through the lens of class warfare and class consciousness. Those enjoying enormous gains in wealth and income have a problem: they must fragment and distract the bottom 95% who have lost income and wealth to the top 5%, lest the bottom 95% realize:

    1. We have lost the undeclared economic war

    2. We have more in common economically with others in the bottom 95% than we do with our neofeudal technocrat/ managerial overlords.

    This unifying class consciousness would threaten the wealth, power and perquisites of the neofeudal technocrat/ managerial class, so they had to undermine an economic awareness of class.

    They found the perfect weapon in identity politics and political correctness. What better way to fragment the working class than to carve it into cultural subclasses that could be manipulated into declaring war on each other?

    This is why the protected technocrat/ managerial class is freaking out about Trump's victory: the inchoate sense that the few have profited at the expense of the many is an expression of an emergent class consciousness that has the potential to threaten the neofeudal dominance of the New Nobility and its self-serving technocrat/ managerial class.

    So when the protected class of well-paid institutional "progressives" speak darkly of "reversing 40 years of social progress," what they're really saying is we're terrified that the bottom 95% might be waking up to our Great Con of identity politics and political correctness.


    http://charleshughsmith.blogspot.com.au/2016/11/the-great-con-political-correctness-has.html


    Henry Porter follows with:

    "Britain’s withdrawal from its nearest market and America’s proposed isolationism will do more to destroy jobs and prosperity than any policy either country has pursued since the war."

    It would have been good if he substantiated his argument.

    It's far easier to trigger the irrational childish fears and insecurities of the masses than to educate them in understanding (and overcoming) the true nature of the economic and social problems confronting them.

    By the time Obama leaves office the US will have accrued over 20 trillion dollars of debt (true debt much higher) - how was this allowed to happen, who are the beneficiaries of the debt/credit, how are the taxpayers going to pay it back, can they pay it back?

    j




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