April 25, 2013

And this is why we should only eat real food

No refrigeration:  Macca's burger purchased in 1999 still looking appetizing in 2013
Need more proof that not all take away is equal, or defeatable?  Look no further than the latest evidence of a McDonald's burger, still perky after 14 years of storage in non-health and safety approved conditions.

Sure, the pickle has broken down - although still identifiable - but the bun and the meat are good to go. 

Evidently, the only thing that will survive a nuclear bomb is not cockroaches, but Macca's burgers (and fries; has anyone tried this with the fries?).

I won't be giving up my thirty cent soft serve cone any time soon, but I'll be sticking to my local curry, Thai and Italian take away when in need of fast food.

McDonald's burger that looks the same as day it was cooked 14 years ago

14 comments:

  1. Wow. That's uncanny burgerage for a burger of that age.

    New food rule for the bomb shelter! Hold the ketchup, hold the relish.

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    Replies
    1. Dogimo - I was thinking of all the money, time and science that NASA applies to feeding astronauts in space, when all they need to do is send up a supply of Macca's burgers.

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  2. The amount of preservatives in that shit is petrifying, Caz... ;)

    Same goes for the fries, I believe.

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    Replies
    1. If only someone would turn it into a face cream, Kath!

      I do wonder, though, if this was tried with burgers from other global chains, would the results be much different? Perhaps not. People eating those other brands might be a bit smug about avoiding Macca's, but they might have little reason.

      Do wonder that millions of people eat there everyday, despite the knowledge that it's food, sure, but not as we know it.

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    2. Sure its petrifying Kathy. That's the point. Otherwise the shit would have fallen apart years ago.

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  3. Anonymous9:15 PM

    azodicarbonamide - that's what you will eat in the bun.

    Other uses:

    The principal use of azodicarbonamide is in the production of foamed plastics as an additive. The thermal decomposition of azodicarbonamide results in the evolution of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ammonia gases, which are trapped in the polymer as bubbles to form a foamed article. - Wiki

    Enjoy.

    j

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    Replies
    1. Which explains why the burger patties give the impression of still being sealed in their plastic coverings.

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  4. Anonymous9:33 PM

    sodium acid pyrophosphate - that's what you'll eat in the fries

    Other uses:

    n leather treatment, it can be used to remove iron stains on hides during processing. It can stabilize hydrogen peroxide solutions against reduction; it can be used with sulfamic acid in some dairy applications for cleaning, especially to remove soapstone. When added to the scalding water, it facilitates removal of hair and scurf in hog slaughter and feathers and scurf in poultry slaughter. In petroleum production, it can be used as a dispersant in oil well drilling muds. - Wiki

    Bon appetitty

    j


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    Replies
    1. Hey! I've looking for something to get rid of the bloody soapstone.

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    2. Hmm. Macca's fries as possible cheap hair removal solution? Worth a try!

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    3. Oops, wrong one.

      ----

      Geoffff - I'd try rubbing with a handful of fries!

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  5. Replies
    1. Sometimes I despair of bureaucracy but its good to see it gets it right sometimes. Any company that markets peanuts in the shell as "monkey nuts" deserves every recall it gets. Especially in a cold climate.

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    2. All the same, it's a depressing day when people with nut allergies are deemed so stupid that the photo of peanuts and the name of the product containing the word "nuts" isn't sufficiently clear to save them from themselves.

      No wonder the world is becoming dumber.

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