September 18, 2006

Word of the Day

Everyone needs this word in their personal lexicon: snirtle

Snirtle is both a noun and a verb.

Meaning: A soft, suppressed laugh, a soft snortle (itself a reduced snort) or shortened snigger.

A snort is greater than a snortle, which is greater than a snirtle.

A snirtle should not be confused with a snigger, which is more vigorous and lasts longer than a snirtle.

10 comments:

  1. "Snigger" also has the connotation of being done at someone else's expense. Doesn't it?

    In any case, snirtle is going to be my word of the day for at leaat a month.

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  2. I'll look forward to seeing you boldly and effortlessly integrate snirtle into your everyday blog posts and daily greetings to strangers.

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  3. Did you just make this word up, Caz? Not that there's anything wrong with that if you did...just askin', is all..

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  4. Holy crap, you didn't! The world is utterly mad.

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  5. No, no, no, I'm just not that clever James. Wish I was. (Timmy is the designated Melbournian word-maker-uppera person.)

    All words used on this blog are real. No letters of the alphabet were abused or harmed in putting the words together.

    You may go forth and snirtle to your little heart's content, safe in the knowledge that there is a real word to describe your activity.

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  6. Sample sentence:

    "Myrtle, did you put arsenic in my tea again?" said George, sipping at his cuppa experimentally.
    Myrtle snirtled quietly over her scones ...

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  7. See, A-plus to Timmy.

    Beautiful work, as always.

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  8. Anonymous11:08 PM

    Sample reply sentences:

    Myrtle's snirtle however, was brief, for quick thinking George had swapped cups."Myrtle the turtle is no more" snirtled George
    loudly!

    He who snirtles last, snirtles loudest!!

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  9. I'm snirtling right now.

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  10. I suspect I snirtle quite a bit :]

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